Welcome to WIR Regional Writer-in-Residence Michael Hingston

We are so excited to welcome Michael Hingston as the regional Writer-in-Residence!

As the regional Writer in Residence, Michael Hingston will split his time between Fort Saskatchewan, St. Albert and Strathcona County, with multiple-month stints in each community. A journalist and best-selling author, his work has appeared in Wired, The Washington Post, The Atlantic, The Guardian, Atlas Obscura, The Daily Beast, Hazlitt, Salon, The Walrus, and The Globe and Mail. He has written on topics including Roald Dahl, salt and why everything in Alberta is named after Winston Churchill. Hingston is also the co-founder of Hingston & Olsen Publishing, home of the Short Story Advent Calendar.

“Most writing happens when you’re alone in a room, but we all benefit from talking and sharing our work with others,” said Hingston. “I can’t wait to meet the great writers in these communities and help them produce something really special.”

Hingston’s first book, The Dilettantes, was published in 2013. His next book is about Calvin and Hobbes, and will be published by ECW Press in the spring of 2018.

Welcome to new EPL Writer-In-Residence Darrin Hagen

We are excited to welcome Darrin Hagen as the EPL Writer-in-Residence!

A playwright, actor, sound designer, composer, performer, director and TV host, Darrin Hagen is the Artistic Director of Guys In Disguise, currently celebrating three decades of drag comedies that have toured across North America. He has received seven Sterling Awards for his work in the Edmonton theatre scene, and over 40 nominations. His writing debut was the award-winning The Edmonton Queen in 1996 followed by Tornado Magnet: A Salute to Trailer Court Women. Hagen’s numerous creations have been produced across Canada, in the U.S. and as far away as Ireland.

“I’m beyond excited to meet and work with the diversity of creative voices that make up the Edmonton writing community – not only the writers I’m familiar with, but also those whose work I haven’t experienced yet,” said Hagen. “The streak of unique artistic creativity in our city has always impressed and inspired me, and I know I will learn so much by spending 2018 immersed in the imaginations of others.”

Hagen has been inducted into the Q Hall of Fame Canada and the Edmonton Queer Hall of Fame. In 2005 he was named one of 100 Edmontonians of the Century, and last year was named one of Alberta’s 25 Most Influential Artists in the last 25 years. He is currently working on a series of presentations that will illuminate the important histories of western Canada’s LGBTQ+ population.

Greetings from Marty Chan

Happy New Year!

I’m excited to serve as the regional writer in residence. My home base will be the Strathcona County Library until the end of April, and I can’t wait to meet the writers in this community. Already, I’ve met the amazing staff at the library, and I’ve learned where they’ve stashed all the snacks. Trust me; writers need snacks. Always.

Writers also need a community. We spend most of our writing hours holed up in a basement office or hidden in the quiet corner of a coffee shop or library. Sometimes, we feel as if our only companions are the cats that splay across our keyboards when we’re trying to work. When we go out, we can’t talk to Muggles about our works in progress, because we fear our co-workers will scurry away at the mere mention of “writer’s block.” It’s a relief when we stumble across another member of our tribe–someone who understands character arcs, plot holes, weak climaxes, and Oxford commas.

I invite you to let your cats sleep on your keyboards for one afternoon. Join me on Saturday, January 16 for my official kickoff. Not only will you hear about the exciting programs I have planned, but you’ll also learn about resources that can help writers. I’ve invited people from the Writers Foundation of Strathcona County, the Canadian Authors Association, and the Writers Guild of Alberta to talk about what they can do to help writers.

If that isn’t enough, I’ve added one more guest to the roster. Paul Matwychuk of the Alberta Foundation for the Arts will talk about grants that can give writers the time they need to work on their manuscripts. The timing is perfect because the next AFA deadline is February 1.

The Meet & Greet & Book Swap promises to be a fun afternoon filled with great information for writers of all levels and genres. Bring a book to swap so you can share your love of reading and kickstart a conversation with a fellow writer. Make 2016 be the year you take the first step to fulfilling your dream of becoming a full-time writer. But leave your cat at home.

 

 

 

The Last Post of 2015

SFE_120108_0721Hello dear readers:

I will be doffing this cap as writer in residence officially at 11:59 pm on Thursday, December 31, 2015.

It’s been a grand year.  I thank all of you who trusted me with your words and who took time to visit or attend workshops and special events.  Truly, it was an honour and a privilege.

2016 will see me returning to my own writng regime and travelling to Serbia, Croatia, and nearby countries to research my novel.  I also hope to finish up my book of poetry.  Of course, I will still be mentoring writers in my role at YouthWrite and beyond.  It is a role I take seriously.  If you have a few moments, please read this very fine essay by Nick Ripatrazone.  I found it a piece of truth and beauty, wise words for any writing mentor or English teacher:

“You need to love words. You don’t need to love a certain type of book or a particular writer, but you need to love letters and phrases and the possibilities of language. You will spend most of your days dealing with words, and students can sense if words do not bring you joy.” – 55 Thoughts for English Teachers

I wish you peace and joy this season.  May 2016 see us open our hearts and minds to this world, its creatures and people.  The world could use a little more compassion.

Best wishes for your writing,

Gail

www.gailsidoniesobat.com

sobina@telusplanet.net

www.youthwrite.com

info@youthwrite.com

This week’s great un-/ undersung CanLit title worth checking out:

The Gardens Where She Dreams Rebecca Luce-Kapler explores the dimensions of a woman’s experience from early memory through young infatuation toward deepening insight as an adult. A beautiful and lyrical reflection on the life and art of Emily Carr.  Quintessentially Canadian!

Writing Quote: ““I love deadlines. I love the whooshing noise they make as they go by.”
― Douglas Adams, English writer (1952-2001)

Writing Tips:  “Vigorous writing is concise.” ~William Strunk Jr.

Writing Prompt: Whilst digging in your garden, you find a…

Image by Stuart Freedman:  UK – London – A performer (Mummer) dressed as the Holly Man – the winter guise of the Green Man – processes along the Thames in a traditional ‘wassail’ ritual to welcome the New Year

 

Welcome to the 2016 Writers in Residence: Marty Chan and Wayne Arthurson!

We are just in the process of adding the details about another exciting year of Regional WIR programming and consultations. Please check back to this site for that information within the next 2 weeks.

In the meantime, please check out this news release from the Edmonton Public Library: Libraries Set to Welcome 2016 Writers in Residence.

The three regional libraries will welcome Marty Chan as our WIR this year, and he has already provided some FAQs about his services.

Some thoughts on Remembrance Day

Missing in ActionTat 

the telegram came

I fell to my knees

my sister says

I don’t remember any of it

something bone china

in me cracked

like the set you sent me for Christmas

from England

now I can no longer pour hot tea

into that translucent cup

STOP

I bought dresses

went to dances

wept nights empty

watched day dawn

dashed to the dress shop

half-believed another telegram

would one day arrive

STOP

Previous telegram mistake

STOP

Private Marcel injured but alive

STOP

Discovered disoriented but well

Returning May 1944

STOP

Sends his love

STOP

No such message ever arrives

I carry on this smalltown existence

shopping selling

eating dancing

weeping grieving

living

STOP

 

from How the Light is Spent (Wintergreen Press 2013)  ©Gail Sidonie Sobat

Some interesting articles to consider this Remembrance Day: 

 

YouthWrite® Turns Twenty: 

If you don’t already know, YouthWrite® is a camp for young writers and has been a passion of mine for 20 years.  Over two decades, I’ve seen difference it makes in the lives of the thousands of kids who have attended. Please consider donating and to passing the word about our campaign. We have some fun perks!  So past participants (or parents of YouthWriters, past or present) of YouthWrite or JustWrite, consider making a young writer’s dream come true by donating to our Indiegogo Campaign. We need your support to keep our writing camps going in perpetuity!                           Screen Shot 2015-10-23 at 8.54.09 AMhttps://www.indiegogo.com/projects/youthwrite-s-roaring-20th-birthday/x/156479#/

 

 

This week’s great un-/ undersung CanLit title worth checking out:

The Perilous Realm Series: The Shadow of Malabron, The Fathomless Fire, The Tree of StoryThomas Wharton – Wharton’s trilogy tells the story of a boy from our world who stumbles upon the Perilous Realm, the world that stories come from. With a group of friends that includes a girl with the power to shape stories, and a talking wolf who might turn out to be a bloodthirsty killer, the boy must struggle against a single dark and powerful Story that threatens to consume all others. Protagonist Will “he (and Wharton, for that matter) absolutely revels in the magic of the Realm.” – (Globe & Mail)

 

Writing Quote: “My own feeling is that civilization ended in World War I, and we’re still trying to recover from that,” he said. “Much of the blame is the malarkey that artists have created to glorify war, which as we all know, is nonsense, and a good deal worse than that — romantic pictures of battle, and of the dead and men in uniform and all that. And I did not want to have that story told again.” – Kurt Vonnegut Jr., American author (1922-2007)

Writing Tips:  “Be a Sadist. No matter how sweet and innocent your leading characters, make awful things happen to them-in order that the reader may see what they are made of.” — Kurt Vonnegut Jr.

Writing Prompt: “Start as close to the end as possible.” – Kurt Vonnegut Jr.

It’s a New Dawn!

d-motta_fuentes-quote-page-003Welcome to the post-election blog.  This lovely fall day welcomes a new chapter in our country.  The coming four years promise to be very interesting.

Robert Dahl, Sterling Professor of Political Science emeritus at Yale and the author of many widely cited books on democratic theory, “has always insisted that free elections, the most obvious criterion of modern representative democracy, must be complemented by a number of other criteria involving universal suffrage and individual freedoms.”

Individual freedoms, clearly, include the freedom of the press and the freedom of expression – the role of the writer, whether one agrees or dissents from the ruling government’s positions or ideolog(ies).  As you, gentle reader, no doubt know: “In Canada, section 2(b) of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms protects “freedom of thought, belief, opinion and expression, including freedom of the press and other media of communication.”

For nearly 10 years, you and I have borne witness to the eroding of our freedoms of the press, scientific thought and expressions of dissent. As a writer, I’ve taken special umbrage with this dangerous erosion.

wdqFAP2FAzar Nafisi, author of Reading Lolita in Tehran, argues that fiction is democracy’s oxygen. Her latest book, The Republic of Imagination, is “a celebration of the power of fiction and its importance to a vibrant democracy.”  Here are a few comments from her conversation with CBC’s Anna Maria Tremonti: 

AN: In a democracy, we need to provide our citizens with a greater education where they will fulfill their passions and the meaning that they want of out of life and not simply making money….Just take the simple fact of voting….If our children, if we do not have enough knowledge, if we do not know about our country, what it was based on and if we do not know what we want of this country–take history, take fiction out of our curriculums (sic), out of our public spheres, how can we vote for the kind of a person who would be good for us and for our country?

AMT: You write that in Iran you discovered that you need democratic imagination in order to have individual rights and the right to free expression.

AN: What is it that the non-democratic state first of all targets?…women1-ken-saro-wiwa-300x225, minorities, culture.

AMT: In fact, how many times have we seen in history people burning books, jailing the authors, jailing the playwright, those are the people they shut away….

AN: It is because when we are deprived of every respect for humanity, when we see the worst actions that human beings do to one another we instinctively turn to the best that humanity has to offer and that is the works of the imagination….

AMT: Why do tyrants understand the dangers of democratic imagination more than our policy makers appreciate its necessity.

AN: Because it’s so immediate. Because of the fact that as soon as you come to power, who is it that is not saying what you want them to say? Who is it that gives voice to your enemies?….But that is why they hate it, because they can’t control [writers, the press].

Let us hope that starting forth on this new day, Canada’s new government will not muzzle the press or our scientists or underfund our artists and writers.  The future of Canada as a democracy depends on it.

 

YouthWrite® Turns Twenty: 

If you don’t already know, YouthWrite® is a camp for young writers and has been a passion of mine for 20 years.  Over two decades, I’ve seen difference it makes in the lives of the thousands of kids who have attended. Please consider donating and to passing the word about our campaign. We have some fun perks!  So past participants (or parents of YouthWriters, past or present) of YouthWrite or JustWrite, consider making a young writer’s dream come true by donating to our Indiegogo Campaign. We need your support to keep our writing camps going in perpetuity!                           Screen Shot 2015-10-23 at 8.54.09 AMhttps://www.indiegogo.com/projects/youthwrite-s-roaring-20th-birthday/x/156479#/

This week’s great un-/ undersung CanLit title worth checking out:

Half-WorldHiromi GotoMelanie Tamaki is human—but her parents aren’t. They are from Half World, a Limbo between our world and the afterlife, and her father is still there. When her mother disappears, Melanie must follow her to Half World—and neither of them may return alive. Like a Hieronymous Bosch painting come to life, Half World is vivid, visceral, unforgettable, a combination of prose and images that will haunt you.

Writing Quote: “Reading and writing, like everything else, improve with practice. And, of course, if there are no young readers and writers, there will shortly be no older ones. Literacy will be dead, and democracy – which many believe goes hand in hand with it – will be dead as well.” – Margaret Atwood, Canadian author (b. 1939)

Writing Tips:  “It’s doubtful that anyone with an internet connection at his workplace is writing good fiction.” — Jonathan Franzen

Writing Prompt: Imagine you are a citizen of a society where free expression and dissent are forbidden. Write a piece in which your dissent is coded or camouflaged in your language.

Happy Thanksgiving!

giving thanksautumn-mountain-ash-yellow-leaves-natural-berry-hd

in gold and

red glory the

mountain ash greeted you this

morning as you tripped down the

stairs breathless with

designs of the

day as if all that

mattered were your

errant heart with its

arrhythmic timing and the

frantic pace of

living through ticking

ticking time except

that the mountain ash stopped you

and your eyes filled with

wonder at its

fractal gilt leaves and

bobbing red berries

in autumn’s

gold-plated

light

© 2015 Gail Sidonie Sobat

Another beautiful thanksgiving poem by Joy Harjo, “Perhaps the World Ends Here.”

This week’s great un-/ undersung CanLit title worth checking out: 

I Should be in ChainsKathy Fisher – Fisher experiments with sound – weaving audio, be it live music or ghost voices, in and around her poetry. She is a wordsmith, research lawyer, documentarian, biographer, oral historian and explorer, and always creates with attention to the ear and eye.

Writer’s Quote:Thank you’ is the best prayer that anyone could say. I say that one a lot. Thank you expresses extreme gratitude, humility, understanding.” – Alice Walker, American author (b. 1944)

Writing Tips:  On writing a gratitude journal or keeping a gratitude list (excellent fodder for other writing):

1. Hand-write your gratitude list. The kinesthetic experience of actually writing is valuable for several reasons: First, the physical act helps imprint the feeling of gratitude at the cellular level. Also, since it is a slower process than typing, writing by hand provides more time for contemplation, which makes for a more thoughtful list.

2. Set a realistic goal. Avoid immediate collapse by starting off with a reasonable number of items. If you set out to enumerate some insane number like 50, you’ll end up including stuff that not even the most zealous gratitude junkie would list. Better to limit yourself to one good reason than to dredge up sludge from a too-deep well.

3. Fake it, if necessary. Don’t worry about actually feeling grateful for anything, especially if during your formative years you confused gloom with sophistication. Until you are consistently inclined to see the glass as half full, act ‘as if.’ In other words, start by pretending that you are an authentically grateful person and write down what this alter ego is thankful for. If even this feels like too much of a stretch, maybe you’re getting stuck on semantics. Instead of calling yours a gratitude list, title it “Hey, it could be worse” and take it from there.

from Utne

Writing Prompt:  Think about a troublesome person in your life and craft a piece about why you are grateful for that individual.

 

A Writer’s Education

Liberal-Arts2There’s an old joke that many of my writer friends know well:

A neurosurgeon and a writer are introduced at a party, and the neurosurgeon hovers near the writer, “So what do you do?”

“I’m a writer.” Warily, she takes a sip of her wine.  “And you?”

“I’m a neurosurgeon, but when I retire I think I am going to take up writing.”

“Funny”, the writer drains her glass, “when I retire I was thinking of taking up neurosurgery.”

The truth is that I’ve been writing since I was a child, as have most writers I know.  And, like so many writers, I have spent thousands of dollars and many, many years on my education.  As would any neurosurgeon.

For those who adhere to the 10,000-hour rule, while this blog in no way means to discourage you, it’s important to note that recent years have seen disclaimers and caveats to Anders Ericsson’s original study (see Time and BBC News).

While I do believe in practice, when it comes to a writer’s education, I am a passionate advocate of a liberal arts education. I applaud Alan Wildeman’s recent Globe and Mail article, “We ignore liberal arts at our peril.” Wildeman writes, “as a multicultural country playing in the global arena, Canada needs a citizenry that learns and studies human differences, social behaviours and cultural traditions. It needs a citizenry that encourages respect for human rights, and encourages artistic creation and appreciation of the arts. The humanities and social sciences engage in these intersections and contribute to what makes us human.” If one wants to be a writer, a liberal arts degree is one of the best preparations: “with its focus on the broad spectrum of human endeavour…. to ensure that our self-reflections are broad…and that we do not forget the importance of enlightenment and reason.” Above all, a liberal arts education forces one to read and read widely, often difficult texts that make one think hard and critically. I cannot stress how important this is to the craft of writing.

If one has not had the benefit of a liberal arts degree (and even if one has), then if one wants to write, there’s a good deal of book larnin’ to do – and not just the kind that offers to help you sell and market and write your novel or poetry. Reading. Taking liberal arts courses. Engaging in critical thinking. Challenging comfortable assumptions. Reading the masters. Reading. Reading. Reading. (The Importance of Reading)

Or try neurosurgery instead.

This week’s great un-/ undersung CanLit title worth checking out: 

Santa RosaWendy McGrath “What is real when seen through the eyes of a child? When does the harshness of reality transform idyllic memories? The young narrator…seeks the answers to these questions as she tries to make sense of the disintegration of her parents’ marriage—a process echoed by the slow disintegration of their neighbourhood. In subtle poetic prose, Wendy McGrath evokes afternoons at the fair captured in overexposed photographs, and a family’s disquieting day at the beach as moments that exist apart from time, in a place where every sense is heightened, and where every memory is sharpened as if in a lucid dream where understanding lies just beyond reach.”

Writing Quote: “I quickly saw the immense power of a liberal education. For me, the most important use of it is that it teaches you how to write. In my first year in college, I took an English composition course. My teacher, an elderly Englishman with a sharp wit and an even sharper red pencil, was tough. Now I know I’m supposed to say that a liberal education teaches you to think but thinking and writing are inextricably intertwined. When I begin to write, I realize that my “thoughts” are usually a jumble of half-baked, incoherent impulses strung together with gaping logical holes between them. Whether you’re a novelist, a businessman, a marketing consultant or a historian, writing forces you to make choices and it brings clarity and order to your ideas.” – Fareed Zakaria, Indian-born American journalist and author, host of CNN’s Fareed Zakaria GPS (b. 1964)

Writing Tips:  “Reading before writing… becomes a way of conversing with other writers.”- Stephanie Vanderslice   “You must try to know everything that has ever been written that is worth remembering and you must keep up with what your contemporaries are doing.” – Richard Bausch

Writing Prompt: Inviting __________________ to dinner. (e.g. Shakespeare, your favourite author, Tommy Douglas, Lady Gaga, etc.)

Part Two – Another Ten (Under -rated/-recognized) Titles

????????????????????????????????????????On my way back from vacation, I heard a segment from CBC’s The Next ChapterHost Shelagh Rogers spoke with writer and academic Randy Boyagoda on a topic related to this and my last post:  those books that “fly way under the cultural radar,” the ones that don’t get noticed (or enough notice) to catch the attention of the awards committees or nominators. How do such books (often from small and/or regional publishers) compete with the literary giants and their behemoth publishers?  What is the virtue of seeking out the undiscovered “hyperlocal” book?

In effect, selecting off-the-radar titles returns to the reader his or her reading agency – the right to select a book because something about it speaks to the reader rather than reading tastes being pre-determined and/or directed by a list.

Here is a transcript of the pertinent segment (the entire segment begins at 42:10 at the link above):

SR: What’s the conventional way that [hyperlocal] books find readers in Canada?

RB: That’s the challenge…beyond a community of already committed readership that poets and other writers have… the primary means by which books are read and discussed today is the prize or the prize economy….We read prize list announcements….If it weren’t for prizes, many books that otherwise would be very much worthwhile reading would be ignored, and that is…probably the best argument for literary prizes: that they bring to wider attention books that otherwise may not enjoy the hearing that they would deserve. But I think prizes also can have… a negative, a cramping effect upon our literary imaginations.

SR: So what happens these days to books that don’t win prizes or make a long list, even?

RB: ….If it weren’t for those prizes, these books really do kind of slip away because we have such an accelerated understanding of why and how books matter….Books tend to matter basically in this country from late September until…early November and then again during Canada Reads. And it seems…like a kind of strange way to… understand the life of a book.  That right after a given prize season….[overlooked books] kind of ‘[wither] on the vine’…a sad image of a book that should have a life beyond a prize season. But why is it? We’re all kind of invested in this….  American English professor…James English… [has] written a book about this called The Economy of Prestige, and it’s basically a study of literary [and other] prizes and their constant, rampant proliferation and why and how these things have come to matter so much to our understanding of what we should listen to, what we should watch, who we should read…I think he makes a very persuasive argument that [prizes] kind of speak to almost a loss of our own self-confidence… why do I want to read this? I want to read this because I think it’s important; I think it’s interesting or this book critic has made a good argument or this book columnist has made this good argument for it instead of I want to read this because it won a prize.

SR: Well, literary prizes are awarded by juries made up of people so there’s subjectivity involved; there’s human appetite, human frailty so it’s not like running a race where there’s the first, second and third place medals that are obvious. How do you think readers should view the mechanics of prize-giving?

RB: [Reading only prize-winners] wouldn’t have been the case… 25-30 years ago when books…had a more prominent place in our culture as… common documents for conversation. So what have I done? In my own reading experience, I kind of reacted against [the prize-award system] in discovering this local, this next door poet and seeing my world around me in a very exciting way.

So in celebration of seeing our world around us in very exciting ways, I offer the next ten titles for your consideration and reading pleasure.  Hereafter, I will endeavour to include an under-represented/-read Canadian title in every blog post.

Stone Soup – Kate Marshall Flaherty  (poetry collection recommended by Randy Boyagoda) – Inspired by the poetic folktale… the cauldron of these inviting poems effortlessly blends ingredients both earthy and spiritual, jaunty and tender, compassionate and ecstatic. The poems encompass generations of family and friends and embrace a wide spectrum of cultures and traditions to reveal heights and depths of our common humanity from fresh and surprising angles of vision.

The Wolf’s Head – Peter Unwin – Unwin lays out the history of the lake and its lands… the stories of the…men who sought the Ontonagon Boulder, the strangling dread of Mishipizheu, the maddening determination of voyageurs….filled with extraordinary facts, humorous anecdotes, and an understanding of the people.  In simple, witty language that endears and engages, Peter Unwin brings Lake Superior to life like no other writer has, delivering in vibrant prose, the history of the Wolf’s Head.

Kissing Keeps Us Afloat – Laurie MacFayden – Kissing Keeps Us Afloat is humorous and joyful, uninhibited and sassy. In love with words and images, MacFayden positively swaggers in these exuberant poems that are loose and open and stylish. The poems touch on fear and loss, revenge and regret, but come back to the sensual, back to love, and to the beauty of the world.” – Shawna Lemay

Crown Shyness – Curtis Gillespie – “’Every journalist who is not too stupid or too full of himself to notice what’s happening around him knows that what he’s doing is morally indefensible. He is like a confidence man, preying on the vanity, loneliness and stupidity of other people, gaining trust and then betraying them.’ In many ways, this quote sums up Crown Shyness….Gillespie’s tale is powerful… ending with a gut-punch climax.” – Quill & Quire

Gaits – Paulette Dube – A poetic look at movements made by animals and humans during a cycle of four seasons. The poems are rich in their simplicity, and convey the depth and mystery of the animal-human connection. Reverse anthropomorphism occurs and the humans come away having (un)learned something about the citizens of the forest while deepening an understanding of themselves….that as a species we are lost and lonely without our connection to the land, but that this connection reverberates with consequences.

The Alchemists of KushMinister FaustTwo Sudanese “lost boys.” Both fathers murdered during civil war. Both mothers forced into exile through lands where the only law was violence. To survive, they became ruthless loners and child soldiers, before finding mystic mentors who transformed them to create their destinies.The Alchemists of Kush is both a powerful and vital contribution to Canadian literature that looks at contemporary Edmonton from an African-Canadian perspective.” – Wayne Arthurson

Spider’s Song – Anita Daher – Stuck in Yellowknife with her crazy grandmother, AJ is one angry and lonely girl. Her blog has become her main source of contact with the world where she reveals her innermost hurts—the absence of her mother and of her father, who abandoned AJ when she was just a little girl; and the moving around she and her mother have had to do every few years for reasons she has never understood. And recently, she’s begun to cut herself—a powerful habit and shame she is trying to overcome. A gripping, chilling tale.

Body Trade – Margaret McPherson – Weaving together two stories of survival, the main narrative follows Rosie and Tanya, two young Canadian women who leave NWT and head south on an ill-conceived road trip through California, Mexico and Central America. The story takes a life-defining twist when their search for freedom and adventure beings them into contact with predators of the Central American sex-trafficking trade. Body Trade asks: To what terrifying places will we journey, and at what cost, in order to save our own lives?

The Little Girl Who Was Too Fond of MatchesGaetan Soucy (trans. Sheila Fischman) – The peculiar narrator of The Little Girl Who Was Too Fond of Matches is an unnamed adolescent unsure of what to make of the world or who they are, even whether they are male or female. When the family patriarch dies, the family’s isolation is broken, and shocking secrets are revealed. Filled with intrigue, suspense and flights of fancy, Gaétan Soucy’s novel is an original and challenging work of fiction. Heralded as a literary star in Quebec, Soucy deserves to be read everywhere in Canada.

Fruit – Brian FrancisFruit tells the story of 13-year-old Peter Paddington as he tries to fix everything wrong about himself before his Grade 8 year ends. Specifically, to lose weight, get a boy friend and silence his talking nipples. Although lauded by CBC Canada Reads in 2009, I’d hate to see this novel fade into oblivion. It deserves to be read and re-read (and taught) across the country. “Laugh-out-loud funny.” – NOW  “Hilarious and gentle.” – Booklist

 

(And thanks to all who suggested The Book of Mary by me!  Shucks.)

* You’ll note again a decidedly Edmonton/ Albertan bias, but that’s just fine.

 

Writing Quote about prizes: “As for me, prizes are nothing.  My prize is my work.” – Katharine Hepburn, American actress, memoir writer (1907-2003)

Writing Tips:  “Want to win big literary prizes? Make sure your story is about men” – The Guardian

Writing Prompt: A man down on his luck realizes he has psychic mind-reading abilities. He improves his life by playing poker. Everything goes really well for him until one day he comes across another psychic at the tables.